• Archives

  • Pages

  • June 2018
    S M T W T F S
    « Apr    
     12
    3456789
    10111213141516
    17181920212223
    24252627282930
  • Subscribe to our mailing list

    * indicates required
Filed Under (Dog Nutrition) by B-Naturals.com on 11-01-2015
Lew Olson's newly revised edition is filled with an abundance of new topics and information. Whether you are new to home feeding or a seasoned raw feeder, have a senior dog or a new puppy, a pregnant mom or a toy breed, this book presents all the information you need to make the best nutritional decisions for your dog. 

Little dog, big bone.Knowing blood value terms and their significance, when elevated or decreased, can be helpful in making treatment decisions for your dog. Dog owners are oftentimes given this information from their veterinarian, but are oftentimes uncertain or confused about what all the different levels mean. This month, we look at a few of the most common blood chemistry terms. (Please note, blood values and terms can vary by the test or the laboratory producing the results. For the purpose of this newsletter, the values and terms are primarily the United States terms and readings.)

 

Alanine Transferase (ALT)

Want to Feed the Best Diet for Your Dog, But Don’t Know How?

Now there is a fast and easy way to learn! Check out Lew Olson’s easy-to-follow, on-line course videos! Read on to learn about Canine Nutrition and preparing Raw and Home Cooked Diets! Click for Video

This level is typically elevated when active damage has occurred or the liver is irritated. Generally the level needs to be three times the high normal rate to show significant liver damage.

 

Albumin

This is a serum protein. When it shows decreased levels it can indicate starvation, parasites, chronic liver disease, enteritis or glomerulonephritis, blood loss, pancreatitis or long-term feeding of food that contains poor protein ingredients. Increased levels can be the result of fever or dehydration.

 

Alkaline Phosphatase (AP)

Elevated levels can indicate liver issues or bone problems. Elevated AP is normal in puppies due to bone growth. The level can in increased with hypothyroidism, pancreatitis, Cushing’s disease, liver issues, and reactions to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

 

Amylase

This is an enzyme released by the pancreas. Elevated levels can indicate pancreatitis or renal damage.

 

Aspartate Transferase (AST)

This can indicate toxins that affect the liver, such as harsh medications like immiticide used in heartworm treatment, or cancer in the liver. Sometimes injectable medications or vaccinations can cause a temporary rise.

 

Bilirubin

This is a yellow serum that is comprised of dead red blood cells which is normal because cells die periodically. However, it can rise suddenly in the case of certain liver diseases, a reaction to toxins such as aflatoxin, or from leptospirosis or toxoplasmosis.

 

Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN)

Increased BUN (high levels of nitrogen waste products) can occur with renal damage, dehydration (even from panting, anxious behavior, vomiting and/or diarrhea), Addison’s disease or leptospirosis. BUN levels can go up and down, without causing kidney damage.

 

Calcium

Decreased or increased calcium is not an indication of dog needing more or less calcium in the diet. It is more a metabolic measure of how your dog’s system is using calcium. Calcium levels can be higher in puppies, especially large boned puppies during the growth stage. However, high calcium levels in adult dogs can indicate lymphosarcoma or chronic renal disease. It may be elevated in dogs with Addison’s disease, rare fungal diseases in the bone, or bone infections.

 

Cholesterol

Dogs do not develop hardening of the arteries, or get plaque in their arteries as humans due. However, elevated levels of cholesterol may signal hypothyroidism, diabetes, Cushing’s disease, pancreatitis, and steroid use.

 

Creatine Phosphokinase (CPK)

If levels are increased, it can mean muscle inflammation; however levels can be elevated right after a vaccination or needle stick.

 

Creatinine

This is a waste product produced by the kidneys. When this level is elevated, it shows kidney damage.

 

GGT (Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase)

This is another liver enzyme like Alkaline Phosphatase (AP), but not found in bone. It can also indicate excess cortisol which can point to Cushing’s disease. Phenobarbital and steroids can also increase GGT.

 

Globulin

Decreased values may mean Cushing’s disease, inflammatory bowel disease, intestinal lymphangiectasis, malabsorption or protein losing enteropathy. Increased levels may mean tick borne disease, brucellosis, heartworm disease, hepatitis or lymphosarcoma.

 

Glucose

Increased glucose can indicate Diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia. Morphine and steroids can increase glucose levels and these can be elevated during pregnancy or right after a heat cycle.

 

Hemoglobin

Hemoglobin carries oxygen formed in the bone marrow.  Low values can mean tick borne disease, hypothyroidism or heartworm disease. Increased values can indicate diabetes, urinary obstruction or vitamin D toxicity.

 

Lipase

This is a pancreatic enzyme. This level can increase due to upper intestinal inflammation. Pancreatitis can cause increased levels of lipase and so can renal disease. Steroid use can also cause increased lipase levels and cause pancreatitis.

 

Phosphorus

The most common cause of increased phosphorus is renal disease. As the kidneys become damaged they become unable to process phosphorus. Please note that puppies generally have a higher phosphorus reading than adults!

 

Potassium

Dogs with Addison’s disease can show a high potassium level. Dogs that have been vomiting and experiencing diarrhea may have low potassium levels, as well as dogs that have diabetes or have recently had IV fluids.

 

Protein

Increased total protein could be dehydration, inflammation or infection. Low total protein levels could be caused by parasites, IBD, malabsorption, or liver or kidney disease.

 

Red Blood Cells (RBC)

Low values can mean tick borne disease, Heinz body anemia, iron deficiency, leptospirosis or renal failure. Increased values may indicate dehydration, diabetes, Addison’s disease or urinary obstruction.

 

Sodium

Again, diarrhea and vomiting can cause low sodium levels and so can dehydration. Addison’s disease can present with low sodium, while the other adrenal disorder, Cushing’s disease, can present with high sodium.

 

Triglycerides

This is a lipid (fat) in the bloodstream. These levels can be elevated after a meal or may indicate Diabetes, Hypothyroidism, Cushing’s disease or too much steroid use.

 

White Blood Cells (WBC)

Low values can mean tick borne disease, hepatitis or pancreatitis. Increased values can mean Cushing’s disease, leptospirosis or other infection.

 

To help put it all together, below are some common ailments in dogs and the possible elevations in specific blood work that they may indicate. (Note: The ‘+’ in front of the different blood levels represents increased values.)

 

 

 

Addison’s disease

+BUN

+Creatinine

+Calcium

+Sodium

+Albumin

+Protein

 

Chronic Renal Failure

+Amylase

+Lipase

+Albumin

+Protein

 

Cushing’s disease

+Glucose

+Cholesterol

+Triglycerides

+ALT

+GGT

+Alk Phos

 

Diabetes

+BUN

+Creatinine

+Glucose

+Cholesterol

+Alt

+GGC

+Albumin

+Protein

+Total RBC’s

+Hemoglobin

+Hematocrit

 

Hypothyroid

+Cholesterol

+ALT

+Alk Phos

 

 

Kidney Disease

+BUN

+Creatinine

+Phosphorus

 

Leptospirosis

+BUN

+Creatinine

+Bilirubin

+Phosphorus

+AST

+ALT

+CPK

+GGT

+ALK Phos

+WBC’s

+Neutrophils

 

Liver

+ALT

+ALK Phos

+AST

 

Liver Disease

+Bilirubin, direct

+Bilirubin, Total

+Bile Acids

+AST

+Alt

+CPK

+GGT

+Alk Phos

 

Pancreatitis

+Glucose

+Cholesterol

+Triglycerides

+ALT

+GGT

+ALK Phos

+Amylase

+Lipase

+Protein

+WBC’s

+RBC’s

 

Tick Borne Disease

+Bilirubin, total

+ALT

+GGT

+ALK Phos

+Globulin

+Protein

+Reticulocytes

+RDW

+MPV

Low WBC

Low RBC

 

Always ask your veterinarian to explain any increased or decreased blood work your dog may present and what the levels mean exactly for your dog. There are many more blood chemistry tests than what I have listed here, but these are the most common.

 

For further information on blood work and dogs, please check out these links:

 

http://www.2ndchance.info/normaldogandcatbloodvalues.htm

http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/ClientED/lab.aspx

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+2116&aid=987

 

Values Specific for Puppies and the differences from Adults

http://personal.palouse.net/valeska/puppy-bloodwork-values.htm

 

Happy Thanksgiving

To all my friends in America and

I wish a wonderful fall season to all!

Share


Comments are closed.

Share