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Filed Under (Dog Cancer) by B-Naturals.com on 06-01-2004
Lew Olson's newly revised edition is filled with an abundance of new topics and information. Whether you are new to home feeding or a seasoned raw feeder, have a senior dog or a new puppy, a pregnant mom or a toy breed, this book presents all the information you need to make the best nutritional decisions for your dog. 
By Lew Olson • June 2004 Newsletter
The information contained in this newsletter should only be used as a guideline. Always make sure you have a correct diagnosis from your veterinarian before proceeding and always follow their directions and protocol.

New research in the 90’s showed some promising developments for specific diets for dogs with cancer. It was found that diets that appeared to work best were those low in carbohydrates, high in protein and with good levels of fat. Carbohydrates are made up of chains of saccharides, which are sugars. Sugars in turn offer good fuel for cancer cells.

With that information in hand, the current commercial dog foods were too high in grains and starches to be the best defense for a dog with cancer. Hills Science Diet did develop a canned diet called N/D to fit these guidelines, but this article will offer suggestions to add variety to the dog’s diet with recipes both cooked and raw. And often the best meals made are those made with love.
For an overview on this subject, check my article, Nutrition for Dogs with Cancer which explains this in more detail at newsletter/nutrition-for-dogs-with-cancer/
Also Dr Oglivie’s research may be seen online at this address.
To prepare the diet, we need to look at carbohydrates, fats and proteins. It is important to know what to avoid and what to incorporate into the diet.
Carbohydrates
Foods included in this category are fruits, vegetables, legumes and grains (oatmeal, wheat, rice, barley, millet, amaranth, corn). For a dog with cancer, some carbohydrates are more ‘friendly’ than others, especially those that contain less sugar, or have a lower glycemic value.
In other words, carbohydrates that you can eat when on the Atkins diet. These would include summer squashes such as zucchini, yellow crookneck squash, and patty pan squash, along with dark leafy greens, broccoli, cabbage, brussel sprouts, cauliflower and bok choy. Avoid or use sparingly, the starchy types of vegetables, such as potatoes, yams, carrots, green peas, sweet potatoes and winter squash (hard rind squashes). I would probably avoid all grains if possible.
Protein
It is important to use proteins from animal sources. Avoid plant protein sources such as tofu or other soy products, grain proteins or plant based protein powders. Proteins from plants are incomplete for dogs. They need the additional amino acids found in animal sources. Soy products are also high in phytates, which can block absorption of calcium, magnesium, iron, iodine and zinc.
Good sources of animal protein include beef, chicken, turkey, pork, lamb, canned fish such as mackerel, salmon and sardines, eggs and dairy products such as whole fat yogurt and cottage cheese.
Fats
Meat is a good source of fat, and the fattiest meats include lamb, pork and goat. When feeding poultry, leave the skin on, which is where most of the fat resides, and use dark meat, which is higher in fat, rather than light meat. Canned fish is also a good source of fat. Always use whole milk dairy products. Eggs also contain fats. Another kind of fat that is very beneficial is that found in salmon or fish body oils (not cod liver oil). Suggested dose is 1,000 mg (with 180 mg EPA and 120 mg DHA) per ten pounds of body weight daily.
For a cancer starving diet, I would suggest using a ratio of approximately 40% protein, 40% fat, with the rest being carbohydrates. It is also possible to feed a lower amount of carbohydrates, when feeding a raw diet that contains bones. I will cover this is the raw diet recipes, but for those who prefer home cooked, carbohydrates are added as fiber. In a raw diet with bones, the bones provide this benefit to help keep stools firm. Since a home cooked diet will be missing the nutrients found in bones, these will be added to the home cooked diets.
For a raw diet, you will probably feed around 2% to 3% of the dog’s body weight daily. This amount can be split in half and fed twice daily, as listed below, or served four times daily in smaller amounts. Variety is suggested to keep the dog’s appetite stimulated.
A Raw Diet
Morning Meal
Feed a variety of high fat protein sources, alternating between or mixing together any of the following:
– Muscle meat: especially high fat varieties such as hamburger, lamb, pork or goat
– Canned fish: including mackerel, salmon, or sardines packed in water, not oil (do not feed tuna)
– Eggs: These are very healthy and can be added to every meal if desired
– Dairy: whole milk yogurt and cottage cheese
– Organ meats: including liver and kidney in small amounts (no more than 10% of the total diet. It is usually best to feed small amounts daily rather than larger amounts periodically, as these foods are rich and can cause diarrhea if too much is fed at one time)
– Heart: this is another very healthy food to include in the diet
– Vegetables: although they are not necessary, you may also want to feed vegetables (either cooked or pureed), including broccoli, dark leafy greens, cabbage, zucchini, crook neck squash and Bok Choy
Evening Meal
Raw Meaty Bones:
– chicken necks, wings, backs and frames
– turkey necks
– beef necks and ribs
– pork necks, breast, feet and tails
– lamb ribs
Raw meaty bones can be ground if the dog has trouble chewing. Northern Tool carries a good meat grinder at www.northerntool.com, part #168620, for about $129.
Cooked Diets
Cooked diets also need to offer variety, and large batches can be packaged into meal sized portions and frozen for later use. Feeding amounts are the same, approximately 2% to 3% of the dog’s body weight daily. For instance, a 100 pound dog would eat two to three pounds of food a day, a fifty pound dog would eat one to one and a half pounds of food daily, and a 25 pound dog would eat 1/2 pound to 3/4 pound daily. A cup is approximately 8 ounces or 1/2 pound, some dogs will do well on two meals a day, others may need three or four smaller meals a day.
More vegetables are used in the cooked diets, to use as fiber. Do not overcook the meat, but rather cook lightly which will retain more of the nutrients. Butter can be used for cooking (unsalted butter for those dogs with kidney or heart problems), for flavor and palatability.
Sample Diet One
(one meal for a 100 lb dog, or two meals for a 50 lb dog, or four meals for a 25 pound dog)
– One lb regular hamburger, 4 oz beef liver or kidney, cook with small amount of butter
– 1 or 2 eggs, scrambled or soft boiled
– 1/2 cup steamed or boiled broccoli
– 1/2 cup cooked yellow crookneck squash
– 4 oz whole milk yogurt
Cook meat, eggs and vegetables and mix. When cooled, add yogurt.
To this, add:
– 1600 mg of calcium , or one teaspoon of dried, ground eggshell
– One teaspoon Bertes Green Blend (for trace minerals)
– One teaspoon of Bertes Immune Blend per 35 lbs of body weight daily
– Add 1,000 mg of EPA fish or salmon oil per ten pounds of body weight daily
Sample Diet Two
– One lb ground chicken, four oz of chicken liver, cook with small amount of butter
– 1 or 2 eggs, scrambled or soft boiled
– 1/2 cup steamed or boiled Spinach
– 1/2 cup cooked cabbage
– 4 oz Cottage Cheese
Cook meat, eggs and vegetables and mix. When cooled, add cottage cheese.
To this, add:
– 1600 mg of calcium, or one teaspoon of dried, ground eggshell
– One teaspoon Bertes Green Blend (for trace minerals)
– One teaspoon of Bertes Immune Blend per 35 lbs of body weight daily
– Add 1,000 mg of EPA fish or salmon oil per ten pounds of body weight daily
Sample Diet Three
– One lb ground pork, 4 oz of pork or beef liver, cook with small amount of butter
– 1 or 2 eggs, scrambled or soft boiled
– 1/2 cup steamed or boiled Bok Choy or Chinese cabbage
– 1/2 cup zucchini
– 4 oz Whole Milk Yogurt
Cook meat, eggs and vegetables and mix. When cooled, add yogurt.
To this, add:
– 1600 mg of calcium, or one teaspoon of dried, ground eggshell
– One teaspoon Bertes Green Blend (for trace minerals)
– One teaspoon of Bertes Immune Blend per 35 lbs of body weight daily
– Add 1,000 mg of EPA fish or salmon oil per ten pounds of body weight daily
Sample Diet Four
– One can 16 oz Mackerel or Salmon
– 1 or 2 eggs, scrambled or soft boiled
– 1/2 cup broccoli
– 1/2 cup Kale or other dark leafy green
– 4 oz Cottage Cheese
Cook vegetables and eggs (no need to cook the canned fish, it is already cooked) and mix together. No calcium is needed as mackerel, salmon or sardines already contain soft, steamed bones for calcium content.
To this, add:
– One teaspoon Bertes Green Blend (for trace minerals)
– One teaspoon of Bertes Immune Blend per 35 lbs of body weight daily
– Add 1,000 mg of EPA fish or salmon oil per ten pounds of body weight daily
Another supplement that is beneficial for dogs with cancer whether feeding a raw diet or a home cooked diet is Berte’s Immune System Support. A key ingredient in this herbal blend is the Ganoderma mushroom which inhibits tumor growth. This product should be used two to three weeks on and one week off.
Snacks
Snacks for these dogs are fairly easy. High protein, high fat treats without carbohydrates include cheese cubes, hard boiled eggs, beef jerky and liver squares.
To Make Liver Squares
Boil liver for ten to fifteen minutes and drain. Cook at low heat on either side for ten minutes in the oven. Let cool and cut into squares or cubes.
In the event you may run out of home made diets, you can keep cans of mackerel, salmon or sardines in the cupboard, and have a supply of frozen vegetables in your freezer. The vegetables can be quickly cooked and added to the mackerel. Scrambled eggs made with butter and adding yogurt is also another quick meal.
There are some canned commercial foods that can be used for traveling, boarding or kept just in case. These include:
Active Life carries beef, lamb and chicken with a bit of pasta and carrots.
Natures Variety carries a grainless canned food in beef, chicken and lamb.
Also Merrick Pet Foods offers several varieties that do not include grains.
Another good canned food for variety is tripe.
Solid Gold Green Cow Tripe Canned Dog Food is another one.
Contact Me
If you would like to ask me any questions about my products, I would love to hear from you. Please check your return address when you send me email from my web site and try to write me again if you have not heard back from me.
To email: lew@b-naturals.com
To order call toll free: 1-866-368-2728
To fax an order: 1-763-477-9588
Email orders are also accepted
© Copyright 2004 Lew Olson, All Rights Reserved


Comments:
6 Comments posted on "Cancer Diet"
What diet should I feed my dog with cancer? | Diet on August 14th, 2008 at 2:09 pm #





[…] this article on the B-Naturals site, the author states we should “avoid or use sparingly, the starchy types of vegetables, such […]


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